Scallions from Scallions – Gardening Without Seeds

Scallions from Scallions – Gardening Without Seeds Scallions from Scallions . . . Step by Step

Anyone can do it. Anyone can grow scallions from scallions, aka green onions. No need for seeds. What a concept. I’d heard about doing this and was definitely intrigued. I finally tried it a few months ago after a friend growing garlic from garlic and scallions from Scallions from Scallions – Gardening Without Seedsscallions enthusiastically shared her success. That very afternoon I started growing scallions.

Look at my first success. The 27-inch long scallion in the pictures above and below was planted in our garden at the end of May. It grew from my very first half-inch piece of scallion bulb with roots that I placed in a jar with water. And now it’s hearty and beautiful. Quite amazing that it works. And, it’s so much easier and faster to grow scallions from scallions rather than from seeds.

In the garden picture, the thick, hardy scallions on the right are the “scallions from scallions.” The thinner, slower growing scallions. . . they’re the ones from seeds.

Do you have experience growing scallions from scallions, or other vegetables without seeds? I’d love to hear from you.

Scallions from Scallions – Gardening Without Seeds

Scallions from Scallions – A 27-inch Beauty

Except for the roots and any dry or scraggly ends, the entire scallion—white, light green and dark green—is edible and delicious. Both the white and light green portions have the strongest onion flavor. The dark green portion offers subtler flavor along with its great color. Go ahead, use the whole scallion, it’s such a waste not to.

Scallions from scallions – the process

Scallions from Scallions – Gardening Without Seeds Choose fresh, locally grown scallions whenever possible. However, the one time I tried growing regular supermarket scallions in water, they worked fine. Your choice.

  1. Cut off the top ½ inch of each scallion, leaving the roots attached. (This jar has a couple of purple-tipped scallions along with a more typical white one.)
  2. Place the scallion tops in a narrow, clear glass jar (such as a spice jar) with the roots facing downward and covered in water.
    1. Scallions from Scallions – Gardening Without SeedsNote: If you won’t be planting the scallions in soil, use a tall, thin jar or vase to keep the scallion greens standing upright.
  3. Place the jar on a kitchen counter or windowsill in filtered sunlight.
  4. Add water as necessary to keep the roots submerged.
  5. Although it’s only been 2 ½ days in this second picture, the scallions have already begun sprouting tiny green shoots from their center.
  6. By day 7 (the third picture), when the greens are at least an inch long, you can plant the scallions outside in rich garden soil. Water normally. Within a month or so you’ll have new scallions to harvest.
    1. Scallions from Scallions – Gardening Without Seeds If you leave the bulb in the ground and just harvest the rest of the scallion, it will continue growing.
    2. Or, you could harvest the whole scallion and save the top ½ inch of the bulb with its roots and begin the process of growing scallions from scallions in water once again.
  7. When you continue to grow the scallions in water, do replace the water at least once a week to keep it fresh and clear.
  8. Once your jarred scallions have greens at least 4 inches long, you can begin harvesting.
  9. Enjoy scallions in salads and stir fries, or as a bright, flavorful garnish for soups, stews, grains and so much more.

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4 thoughts on “Scallions from Scallions – Gardening Without Seeds

  1. Hi there! Fun to see you on the street this weekend. Yes, I put the heels of romaine and bok choy, and celery in shallow water and mostly just enjoy watching them reborn and nibbling off them. I might need to plant them. Not sure. Do you know?

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